ADVANCED NANOTECHNOLOGIES AND MICROTECHNOLOGIES


Dissertation thesis topics

The dissertations thesis topics proposed within the Advanced Nanotechnologies and Microtechnologies research programme correspond to the research interests and objectives of research of these research groups: Fabrication and Characterization of Nanostructures, Smart Nanodevices, Optoelectronic Characterization of Nanostructures, X-ray micro CT and nano CT, Micro and Nanotribology, Development of Methods for Analysis and Measuring, Experimental Biophotonics, Transport and Magnetic Properties, Functional Properties of Nanostructures, Plasma Technologies and Synthesis and Analysis of Nanostructures.

For details click on the title of the dissertation.



RG 1-11 Multiscale Modelling and Measurements of Physical Properties (Roman Gröger)


Low-temperature plastic deformation of BCC metals with internal magnetic order 

Plastic deformation of BCC Fe and Cr with internal magnetic order differs significantly from that of non-magnetic BCC metals (V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W). The existing experiments and theoretical studies imply that magnetism stabilizes slip on the most highly stressed {110}<111> system, which contrasts with the complex slip morphology observed in non-magnetic BCC metals. The purpose of this project is to investigate the activity of slip systems in single crystals of Fe and Cr of high-purity under tension and compression at 77 K. These experiments will be carried out for at least 5 orientations of the applied load. The EBSD analysis will be used to orient the samples and to look for the signatures of twinning. The slip trace analysis will be made using the Nomarski interference contrast, SEM, and large-area AFM. TEM analysis will be employed to characterize the dislocation substructure of selected samples. The observed slip activity will be correlated with the theoretical predictions made using the Schmid law and from newly formulated effective yield criteria.

 Multiscale Modelling and Measurements of Physical Properties

SupervisorGröger Roman, doc. Ing., Ph.D. 


Atomistic studies of threading dislocations in III-nitride epitaxial heterostructures 

 Multiscale Modelling and Measurements of Physical Properties


Epitaxially grown nitrides of Al, Ga and In on Si (111) exhibit large mismatch of lattice parameters that is responsible for the nucleation of misfit dislocations. However, experimental studies of these heterostructures reveal large density of threading dislocations with line directions perpendicular to the surface, which are detrimental to electronic and optical properties of these materials. Reduction of the density of the threading dislocations may lead to substantial increase of efficiency of LEDs and laser diodes, and high electron mobility transistors (HEMT). The objective of this project is to utilize molecular statics simulations to determine the structural and electronic properties of these dislocations in bulk GaN, AlN and InN, and in AlN/Si epitaxial films. These studies will be followed by direct simulations of epitaxial growth under the conditions mimicking MOCVD and MBE growth. All simulations will be carried out using our new covalent-ionic description of bonding with self-consistent charge equilibration, which characterizes each atom by its positions and point charges.

SupervisorGröger Roman, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Optimization of magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia in viscous environments 

Magnetic hyperthermia is a method of cancer treatment in which alternating magnetic field (AMF) acting on magnetic nanoparticles causes dissipation of energy into the surrounding tumor and its local overheating. Due to large penetration depth of AMF, it can be used to target body regions that are difficult to reach by other means. It is known that the specific heat rates generated by magnetic nanoparticles quickly deteriorate in viscous media such as blood, urine or inside the cell. This is caused by the particle aggregation and the associated magnetic dipolar coupling, which reduce the overall magnetic moment of the particle and thus its heating efficiency in AMF. The objective of this project is to synthesize polar and non-polar magnetic nanoparticles with large anisotropy and optimize their heating efficiency in solutions of different viscosities and pH values, and under frequencies hundreds of kHz. The structural properties of these nanoparticles will be assessed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of particles in viscous solutions will be assessed by measurements of hysteresis loops at frequencies relevant for biological applications. The detailed characterization of these nanoparticles will culminate into testing the most efficient nanoparticles in vivo.

 Multiscale Modelling and Measurements of Physical Properties

SupervisorGröger Roman, doc. Ing., Ph.D. 



High temperature plasticity and magnetic properties of high and medium entropy alloys 

Solid solutions mixing four and more metals in an equiatomic proportion represent a brand new class of materials exhibiting many unique properties [1]. Particularly striking examples are a combination of high strength and high ductility of CoCrFeMnNi alloy at low temperatures or a possibility to “program” magnetic hysteresis of the same alloy by external field applied during cooling to a low temperature ferromagnetic regime. The original idea linking the thermodynamic stability to high configurational entropy of these materials does not seem to work. In spite of this, systems like the CoCrFeMnNi and some others are in the state of solid solution at the standard conditions. A satisfactory explanation based on thermodynamic principles has not yet been found. Similarly, a self-consistent theory which would provide explanation of the observed magnetic phenomena is missing. Furthermore, many alloys of the class were still not investigated with respect to their high temperature plasticity and related evolution of dislocation structures. Therefore, the topic proposed for the PhD study offers a wide range of possibilities to perform ground braking studies both in the theoretical as well as experimental fields. A subject of the thesis particularly focuses on two topical issues related to the high temperature strength and magnetic properties of the new class of solid solutions with the cubic lattices: 1) microstructural basis of the viscous glide controlled creep [2] and 2) physical background related to the vertical shift of magnetic hysteresis curves [3]. The work assumes an application of various experimental and theoretical methods like micro and nano structural electron microscopy studies or numerical modelling of magnetic structures within a framework of Ising-Heisenberg approximation. The hosting institution will be the Institute of Physics of Materials [http://www.ipminfra.cz/]. I envisage multiple short term attachments at the partner institutions in Germany (Ruhr University Bochum) and in US (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee).

 Multiscale Modelling and Measurements of Physical Properties

SupervisorAntonín Dlouhý, prof. RNDr,. CSc


Description of the slow crack growth in polymer material

Due to increase of the long term application of the polymer materials process of slow stable crack growth became important scientific topic. Therefore, the general goal of the work lies in the accurate description of the slow crack propagation in the case of polymeric structure under complex loading conditions taking into account residual stresses. Slow crack growth can be described by the corresponding fracture mechanics parameters and plays an important part in estimation of this lifetime. Numerical model will be validated by correlation with experimental data of PCCL Leoben and Polymer Institute Brno.

 Multiscale Modelling and Measurements of Physical Properties

SupervisorHutař Pavel, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Experimental study and modelling of prismatic dislocation loops

The prismatic dislocation loops have Burgers vector perpendicular to the loop plane and they are created by irradiation or by plastic deformation. These loops can be easily seen in transmission electron microscope (TEM) and can be produced by Ga+ ions in focused ion beam (FIB). The objective of this project is to study interactions of small prismatic loops with each other and with free surfaces of the TEM foil both experimentally and by atomistic modeling using empirical potentials.

 Multiscale Modelling and Measurements of Physical Properties

SupervisorFikar Jan, Mgr., Ph.D.


Mechanism of the small creep strains of the metallic materials at low stresses and transition to the plastic strain - model development and experimental study

Creep strains measured at very low applied stresses are, by their properties, very different from those measured at higher stresses during the conventional creep tests [1]. The stress and strain dependencies of the creep rate are much weaker and the strain is mostly anelastic.  Deformation mechanisms controlling these strains are not known, mainly because there are no observable signatures of the small strains in the microstructure. The small strain kinetics is clearly related to the internal stresses build-up. At present, only one simplified micromechanical model exists which is based on the dislocation segments bowing. This model combines the viscous glide and climb of dislocations [2], but its predictions are only relevant for very small strains, not explaining the transition to the normal plastic creep regime. The main topic of the thesis is the development of the complex dislocation model which will provide better insight into a nature of creep strains which accumulate at very low stresses. The model should also address the transition into the normal plastic creep regime. The solution will be based on the simplified model mentioned above and will include realistic description of the interactions between dislocations and solute atoms.  Recently developed discrete dislocation dynamics method [3] will facilitate a statistical description of dislocation segments reaching a critical stress condition. Experimental study of the low-stress creep of the selected metallic materials will be important part of the work. The materials having exceptional creep behaviour observed during the conventional creep tests will be targeted. The Institute of Physics of materials AS CR [http://www.ipm.cz] , which is fully equipped  with all the required facilities, will be the workplace .

Supervisor: Kloc Luboš, RNDr., CSc.



RG 1-02 Smart Nanodevices (Jaromír Hubálek)


Nanotransportes of potential drugs based on coordination compounds 

Coordination compounds are very well known for their application in cancer therapy. As an example can serve cisplatin which is still used in medicine. Unfortunately, the cytostatics have a lot of side effects. To overcome them nanotransporters are applied, for example liposomes which can be further modified. The aim of the work will be preparation of such complexes and a study of their biological activity.

► Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorKopel Pavel, doc. RNDr., Ph.D.


Preparation of carbon quantum dots and their application for detection of  biomolecules and ions      

Quantum dots find their application in analytical chemistry as well as in biochemistry. Due to no toxicity more preferred are quantum dots based on carbon. There are many preparation ways and modifications of such quantum dots. The aim of the work will be preparation of carbon quantum dots, their modifications and application in practice.

Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorKopel Pavel, doc. RNDr., Ph.D.



 
13.  CRISPR/Cas9 system to study of secondary metabolism of unicellular algae

The aim of this thesis is to investigate of secondary metabolism of unicellular algae using genome editing based on Crispr/Cas9 technology. The main goal will be the construction of knockout generation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain in genes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Subsequently, use the ambient mass spectrometry under ambient conditions with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and direct analysis in real time (DART) to study metabolome in the obtained strains. 

Development and application of eucaryotic cell-based microcolumn separation techniques

The thesis will focus on development of new generation of electromigration capillary separation techniques by designing, preparation and testing of novel smart interactive phases for capillary electrophoresis or capillary electrochromatography. The designed phases will be based on living cells able to selectively transform target analyte from the complex sample to a detectable product. Manufacturing phase will be based on genetic modification technology enabling not only tailor the cell receptors towards the target analyte (to be extracted from the sample and internalized into the cell) but also modify the cellular pathway for a transformation of the analyte into the product and its release back into the capillary flow.

 Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorAdam Vojtěch, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

 
Synthesis and modification of magnetic particles for isolation and analysis of microbial pathogens

This work is aimed at inorganic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, its surface modification, characterization and testing in the area of an isolation of target molecules for subsequent chemical analysis. Produced particles will be chemically modified for selective isolation of nucleic acid from bacteria. The whole procedure of the isolation will be firstly tested using common laboratory approach and subsequently will be integrated in fluidic device. This device will be than tested for processing of samples of pathogenic bacterial strains.

► Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorAdam Vojtěch, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.


Biophysical study of living cells

A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. The goal of this work is to study adhesion force between nanostructured surface and living cells. The student will set up a system of nanostructured pillars (substrates with those patterns are already available for the student) with desired surface properties. It is expected that the cells will attached to the top of the pillars and due to adhesion forces the cells will deform the pillars’ shapes. The student will capture a real-time video of the structure using either confocal or holographic microscope. The video will be processed by a script in MATLAB environment to create a real-time video of the adhesion force between the cell and the pillars. PhD candidate will work together with Regional Centre for Applied Molecular Oncology (RECAMO).

 Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorNeužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.


Electrochemical detection of protein biomarkers with microfluidic chip

A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. The goal of this work is to perform theoretical study, design, fabrication and characterization of gold electrochemical sensors (EC) made by planar technology in combination with pulse electrochemical method, such as lock-in amplification. PhD candidate will perform detail analysis of electrode behavior and optimize their geometry. Besides that the student will design and fabricate a microfluidic system, which will allow to define the flow of liquid between individual electrochemical sensors. The lock-in amplification technique allows concurrently interrogate a few sensors. Basic characteristic will be perform using model Fe2+/Fe3+ system and compare with standard cyclic voltammetry. PhD candidate will then perform specific reaction antibody/antigen at the gold surface after the surface is treated with a thiol cross linker that there will be different antibody at each EC cell. PhD candidate will work together either with Regional Centre for Applied Molecular Oncology (RECAMO) or with partner group at Mendel University. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC. Part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

 Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorNeužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.


Gecko mimicking structures

A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. The project focuses on a development of a nanostructured materials for gecko mimicking surfaces. The key part of the work is to conduct finite element modelling (FEM) of the desired structure and to fabricate it primarily at CEITEC facility, as well as at National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, USA. Next the surface of the structure has to be treated to get desirable surface properties by self-assembly monolayer and characterize it using force spectrum (force-distance measurement) by atomic force microscope. Creation of a system to demonstrate utilization of the adhesion force is highly desirable. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC. Part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

► Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorNeužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.


Label-free detection of protein biomarkers using ultrathin silicon sensors

A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. The goal of this work is to perform theoretical study, design, fabrication and characterization of nanosheet sensors made by an advanced planar technology in combination with pulse method, such as lock-in amplification. Goal of this work is to study, characterize and optimize an array of sensors made from ultrathin single crystal silicon (chips thickness of 10.5 nm can be used as resistive sensor connected as van den Pauw device or as Hall sensor to detect intensity of magnetic field. Change of charge at its surface will modulate its conductivity or magnetic particle its properties as Hall sensor. The device will be powered by a current pulses and the output will be process by a lock-in amplifier. PhD candidate will identify the system signal noise ratio and limit of detection (LOD) of the biosubstances of interest. He/she will also design and fabricate a simple microfluidic system to confine the tested sample at suitable location at the chip. There is also required to optimize the buffer solutions not to affect the measurement. PhD candidate will analyze the type of silane crosslinkers and their utilization using chemical vapor deposition technique. Basic properties will be conducted using albumin. Next the PhD candidate will perform specific reaction antibody - antigen of one biomarker and determines its LOD. PhD candidate will work together either with Regional Centre for Applied Molecular Oncology (RECAMO) as they have cancer’s biomarkers or with partner group at Mendel University. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC. Part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

 Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorNeužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.


Monitoring of cell energy balance and mapping of cells’ internal temperature distribution

A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno, in collaboration with Institute of Biotechnology (IBT), Prague, Czech Republic. The project focuses on a development of a method to seed cells inside a calorimeter with an internal volume of ≈ 100 fl under an objective lens of a high power optical microscope. A considerable part of the project involves development of special methodology to grow cells in a calorimeter. The method will then be applied to monitor cellular energetic balance with respect to cell life cycle, such as mitosis, induction of apoptosis etc. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC, with a minor involvement of the IBT; part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

 Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorNeužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.


Smart skin

A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. Goal of this work is to perform theoretical study and characterize a nanostructured material which changes color based on the environment. The PhD candidate will first perform finite element modelling (FEM) to determine the physics origin of the structure behavior and fit the model on the actual structure. Then the available structures will be further studies using techniques such as near-field optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The PhD candidate will try to replicate the structure at CEITEC cleanroom or at National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, USA. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC. Part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

► Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorNeužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.


Electrochemical properties of nanostructured materials 

Aim of this work is theoretical study, deposition and characterization nanostructured materials such as Au, Ag and their amalgams. Student is expected to optimize their deposition technique and characterize their properties, such as surface area and composition. Then the student will fabricate biosensing chip based on an array of those nanostructured materials and again perform their fundamental characterization using electrochemical, optical and electrical methods. Then the array of nanostructure electrodes in a microfluidic system will be used to perform an early cancer detection based on diagnosis of circulation cancer DNA. The chip fabrication, characterization will be conducted at CEITEC in collaboration with hospital laboratories, such as RECAMO.

 Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorNeužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.


Study of 2D materials beyond graphene 

Aim of this work is theoretical study, deposition and characterization of 2D materials beyond graphene, such as phosphorene, arsenene, antimonene, silicene and germicene. The student is expected to get familiar with deposition and properties of those materials and characterize them using techniques such as XRD, AFM, SEM and TEM. Then the 2D materials will be placed over electrode system such as H-bar to measure electrical and electromechanical properties. With presence of electrostatic field, the student will perform characterization of the 2D FETs with respect to biosensing. 2D material deposition and characterization will be conducted in CEITEC laboratories, device fabrication will be done at CEITEC as well as in National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, USA.

 Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorNeužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.


Properties study and technology of capacitor on a chip preparation using deep structures and high-k materials

So-called "dry" electrolytic tantalum and niobium capacitors are commonly produced in discrete form. Their structure is described as a MIS (metal-insulator-semiconductor). They have the advantage of high capacity and electrolyte-free construction. MOS capacitors commonly implemented in silicon CMOS technology are MIS as well as, but on the contrary very low capacity. The aim is to use MEMS technology to create deep, also 3D structures and subsequent conformal deposition of thin dielectric films, studying the effects of stress, behaviour of MIS structure, level of tunnelling currents and their dependence on the materials used. Work will partly take place in cooperation with the Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems at the TU Wien.

► Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorHubálek Jaromír, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Mechanical filter bank for low power cochlear implants

For more details contact the supervisor.

 Smart Nanodevices

SupervisorPrášek Jan, Ing., Ph.D


RG 1-03 Experimental Biophotonics (Radim Chmelík)


Strategies allowing for correction of presbyopia in pseudophakic patients

In general, there is currently a variety of solutions enabling the correction of presbyopia, however, ideal would be the restoration of accommodation by mimicking properties of the young natural crystalline lens. Unfortunately, it has not yet been achieved despite the fact that a number of attempts to design accommodative IOL was made so far. Multifocal, mainly bifocal and also trifocal, intraocular lenses (IOL) of different designs are now the prevalent solution of cataract and presbyopia correction allowing simultaneous vision mainly at far and near distances. Due to some drawbacks inherent to multifocal IOL technology, alternative approaches have been developed including attempts to extend the IOL DoF by different means in order to achieve good vision at far and intermediate distances (and also acceptable vision at near). Different strategies can be used to extend the DoF, e.g. multifocal IOLs with very low addition(s) and/or IOL with controlled amount of some aberrations. The main goal of this project is to theoretically and experimentally investigate the impact of these strategies and/or their combinations on DoF and retinal image quality.

 Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorChmelík Radim, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.


Coherence gated holographic microscopy

Holographic microscopy as an important method of quantitative phase imaging became an significant imaging modality for label-free biomedical imaging suitable particularly for quantitative observation of live cell and profiling of its dry mass (Zangle and Teitell, Nature Methods, 2014). Applying of a coherence-gate effect results in a significant improvement in image quality and resolution, and also enables imaging of three-dimensional objects and objects in optically turbid media. The thesis will focus on the research of the coherent gate effect in holographic microscopy and its use in quantitative phase imaging of biological objects.

 Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorChmelík Radim, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.


Biophysical interpretation of quantitative phase image by means of coherence-controlled holographic microscopy and machine learning

The work will be dealing with the interpretation of the quantitative phase images gained by coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM). The possibilities for automated analysis of quantitative phase images by means of supervised and unsupervised machine learning will be investigated. The quantitative phase images enable extraction of valuable features characterizing the distribution of dry mass within the cell and hence provide important information about the live cell behaviour. The work would focus on refinement of the present automated classification of cells while employing the quantitative information from both the single-time-point and time-lapse quantitative phase images. The proposed methods will be tested on the images of live cells in order to estimate the applicability in the cancer cell biology.

 Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorChmelík Radim, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.


 
17. Rigorous simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation in inhomogeneous media

The topic is focused on development of numerical methods for rigorous simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation in arbitrary inhomogeneous media. Namely, we assume investigation of the techniques based on the expansion into plane waves and/or eigenmodes in combination with perturbation techniques. Developed techniques will applied to modeling of light scattering by selected biological samples. Requirements: - knowledge in fields of electrodynamics and optics corresponding to undergraduate courses - basic ability to write computer code, preferably in Matlab.

Development of incoherent holographic microscopy and related techniques

For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

 Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorKolman Pavel, Ing., Ph.D.

 
Significance of coherence-controlled holographic microscope for objective assessment of mixed cells population in cancer cells primary culture

Opportunity of an objective evaluation of behavior of live cells freshly transferred from a tumor into in vitro primary culture has been offered by competence of Coherence Controlled Holographic Microscope (CCHM) in the make of Multimodal Holographic Microscope T1 (MHM, Tescan) for the task. CCHM Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) provides non-invasive cell mass measurements and due to coherence gate effect also in turbid media. Importance of analysis of patterns of motility/migration and growth of various cell types in mixed primary culture is currently emerging from collaboration with clinical surgeons operating on cancer. Assessment of cancer cells' behavior manifested in these conditions will contribute to individual tumor prognosis. Also appraisal of cell resistance/sensitivity to available therapeutic options should contribute to the optimization of the therapy plan. The work will consist of understanding primary cancer cell cultivation, mastering operation of CCHM while doing biological experiment and current standard valuation of cell behavior. To this basics there will be the task of adding elaboration/invention of mathematical description of cell activities comprised in the series of time-lapse images from these observations. Such method then will enable comparisons among various types of cancer cells and will lead to an innovation in the classification of the cancer cell malignancy.

 Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorVeselý Pavel, MUDr., CSc.

 

Dry-mass profiling of live cells with quantitative phase imaging applied to personalised treatment of cancer

Application of coherence-controlled holographic microscopy and other quantitative phase imaging methods for measurements of dynamic dry-mass distributions in live cancer cells in tissue culture Quantitative evaluation of statistically significant changes in cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drugs using dynamic morphometric parameters derived by image processing. The project will include developments in microscopy, image processing, data analysis and tissue culture.

Dry-mass profiling of live cells with quantitative phase imaging applied to personalised treatment of cancer

Application of coherence-controlled holographic microscopy and other quantitative phase imaging methods for measurements of dynamic dry-mass distributions in live cancer cells in tissue culture. Quantitative evaluation of statistically significant changes in cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drugs using dynamic morphometric parameters derived by image processing The project will include developments in microscopy, image processing, data analysis and tissue culture.

► Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorZicha Daniel, Ing., CSc.


Key applications for holographic microscopy 

The fluorescence holographic microscope, unlike a conventional fluorescence microscope, uses two opposed objective lenses and it requires no scanning system. In addition to a well known optical sections (amplitude image), it also provides a phase image revealing information about the optical density of the specimen. Although the microscope is primarily intended for transparent samples capable of emitting radiation (eg fluorescence), it can also be used for holographic imaging of reflective surfaces or for holographic imaging in transmitted light. The task includes the selection of suitable sample types, experiment protocol proposal, design and implementation of accessories for sample preparation, accomodation, fixation and storage in a suitable environment, and sample manipulation during the experiment, experiment control, and testing of the microscope imaging possibilities for different sample types, and publishing results. The aim of the thesis is to find limits of the microscope and to maximize the use of all the imaging capabilities of the microscope and find the most suitable applications for this new imaging technique.                                                     
Requirements: experience in the field of microscopy, knowledge of optics corresponding to university courses, ability to design, patience, reliability, precision. The advantage is: Programming ability (eg Matlab, LabView, C, etc.), Basic knowledge of biology, ability to establish relations with potential partners.

► Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorKolman Pavel, Ing., Ph.D.


3D imaging by the use of fluorescence holographic microscopy 

The fluorescence holographic microscope, unlike a conventional fluorescence microscope, uses two opposed objective lenses and it requires no scanning system. In addition to a well known optical sections (amplitude image), it also provides a phase image revealing information about the optical density of the specimen. The aims of the thesis are development and software implementation of 3D imaging methods using the amplitude and phase image components. Requirements: programming ability (eg Matlab, LabView, C, etc.), knowledge of optics corresponding to university courses, patience, reliability, precision. The advantage is: experience in the design, implementation and control of electronic devices, experience in the field of microscopy.

 Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorKolman Pavel, Ing., Ph.D.


Polarization multiplexing in correlation and holographic imaging 

Correlation and holographic imaging are techniques that allow either quantitative phase or three-dimensional image reconstruction from interference pattern. The doctoral thesis aims to implement new configurations for correlation and holographic imaging, where the light is multiplexed into orthogonal polarization states rather than divided into independent optical paths. Such systems are expected to improve existing and provide new imaging features, which are unavailable in up-to-date experiments. The required polarization states will be generated and modulated using the electro-optic effect in liquid crystal molecules or new generation optical components working on geometric phase.

 Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorBouchal Peter, Ing., Ph.D.


New methods of control for holographic microscopy 

Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy is focused on the observation of living cells in vitro. Long-term observation of living cells necessarily requires automated control of both microscope and experiment. The first goal is to design a new optical arrangement of a fully automated microscope, its mechanical design, and creation of the control software. Another goal is to propose methods for automation of biological experiments, implementing them into control software, and testing in real experiments.

► Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorDostál Zbyněk, Ing., Ph.D.


Multiphoton imaging in personalised treatment of cancer  

Cancer invasion and metastasis is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer patients. The main problems lie in accuracy of diagnosis and the choice of the most efficient treatment. Better utilisation of biopsy material is a promising candidate for improvement. This project focuses on development of a new procedure where the biopsy fragments from cancer patients will be subjected to time-lapse analysis of 3D cell motility based on 2-photon imaging featuring deep penetration. Motile behaviour of cells within the fragments will be quantitative analysed and statistical significance of changes induced by presence of potential chemotherapeutic agents will be evaluated thus indicating a suitable treatment for the relevant patients.

► Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorZicha Daniel, Ing., CSc.


Exploration of genetic and epigenetic determinism of cell behaviour using  quantitative phase imaging

Quantitative analysis of changes in cell behaviour induced by replacement of genetic material using DNA microinjection in vitro. Statistical significance of changes in cell behaviour, such as speed of cell motility, will be evaluation using coherence controlled holographic microscopy and other methods for quantitative phase imaging. Dynamic morphometric parameters will be measured using computer image processing methods. The project will involve microscopy techniques, cell culture, capillary microinjection, computer image processing and data analysis.

 Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorZicha Daniel, Ing., CSc.


Complex automated bioreactor for holographic microscopy

For maximum information yield about live cells behaviour provided by coherence controlled holographic microscopy it is inevitable to design and develop complex automated bioreactor. Such a device should ensure optically suitable accommodation of live cells in the microscope with provision of control over physiological microenvironment and preprogrammed challenges. The task is to design, develop and validate the complex automated biorector for T1 holographic microscope. 

► Experimental Biophotonics

SupervisorVeselý Pavel, MUDr., CSc.



1-04 Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures (Tomáš Šikola)


IR spectroscopy by plasmonic nanostructures

In the study plasmonice nanostructures of novel materials (for instance graphene) for detection of adsorbed complex (bio)molecules by FT IR spectroscopy will be used. Instead of relying on classical spectral shifts of localized surtface plasmon polaritons, the „finger prints“ of the molecules in  optical spectra enhanced by plasmonic effects will be detected. Here, particularly, tunability of plasmon resonance properties of the nanostructures will be utilized. 

►  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorŠikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.

 
Utilization of plasmonic nanostructures for local enhancement of magnetic components of electromagnetic fields  

The study will be aimed at design, fabrication, and characterization of resonant plasmonic nano- and micro-structures (“diabolo” antennas, split ring resonators, etc.)  providing a significant local enhancement of magnetic components of electromagnetic fields. The structures with resonant properties particularly in the  IR and THz will be studied,   with respect to their potential applications in relevant spectroscopic methods. 

►  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorŠikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.

 
Transport properties of 2D Materials

The work will be devoted to a study of transport properties of 2D materials (graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides,….) modified by various layers of adsorbants. Emphasis will be put on in situ-measurements of these properties under well-defined UHV conditions and consequently to their utilization in sensing and other applications. 

  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorŠikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Biosensors based on graphene and related 2D materials 

Classical biochemical tests in vitro are currently being replaced by bioelectronic sensors that excel in their speed, reusability and minimal dimensions. One of the most promising materials in this area is graphene, which has a high sensitivity to the presence of adsorbed molecules and is biocompatible at the same time. The subject of the doctoral thesis will be development and production of biosensors based on graphene and related two-dimensional materials. In the thesis, it will be necessary to master the general physical principles of sensors, problems of field-controlled transistors with an electrolytic gate and functionalization to achieve selective sensor response. A suitable applicant is a graduate of a Master's degree in Physical Engineering, Electrical Engineering or Biochemistry. Aims: Managing physical principles of biosensors, their theoretical and experimental aspects. Design and manufacture of a sensor based on a field-controlled transistor with an electrolytic gate. Functionalization of sensor for specific biological and chemical reaction. Sensor response testing on selected biological materials. Adequate publishing outputs and presentation of results at international conferences.

  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorŠikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Application of KPFM in graphene based sensors and solar cells  

Kelvin's probe force microscopy (KPFM) is an excellent tool for mapping the distribution of surface potential locally up to nanometer resolution. This can be advantageously used in a study of charge distribution on nanometer-sized sensors and at investigation of p-n interfaces of solar cells during their operation. This new information, in addition to commonly studied sensor current responses and solar cell voltage responses, makes it easier to understand the ongoing physical processes, use this knowledge to eliminate the shortcomings of existing devices, and possibly to design higher efficiency devices. At work, you will need to master the general physical principles of KPFM, sensors and solar cells. A suitable applicant is a graduate of a Master's degree in Physics, Electrical Engineering or Chemistry.  Aims: Mastering physical principles and measurement of graphene-based sensors and solar cells. Adopting theoretical and practical aspects of KPFM. Mapping the charge distribution close to a graphene sensor and designing more sophisticated sensors. Mapping the potential distribution on the graphene-semiconductor solar cell interface and designing the cell with higher efficiency. Adequate publishing outputs and presentation of results at international conferences.

  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorŠikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Modeling of functional properties of nanostructures for plasmonics

For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorKalousek Radek, doc. Ing., Ph. D. 


Solid state surfaces and thin films studied by combination of Low Energy Ion Scattering with selected analytical and imagining methods  

Low Energy Ion Scattering is well known for its extreme surface sensitivity. Its application is essential when the topmost atomic layer determines behaviour of various functional systems (catalysis, initial states of oxidation, graphene based systems, magnetic films, etc.). The proposed topic offers an exploitation of LEIS surface sensitivity in combination with other analytical and imaging techniques like for instance XPS, SIMS, AFM, and STM  for a study of selected systems. Aims: Design and optimization of the sample transfer between the LEIS spectrometer (Qtac100) and other analytic and imaging techniques ((XPS, SIMS, AFM, STM, etc.). Modification of the preparation chamber of the LEIS spectrometer for sample treatment and modification technologies. A study of selected systems by combination of the specified techniques with emphasis on LEIS surface sensitivity. Ex-situ analysis and calibration of the selected systems by additional techniques like Medium and High Energy Ion Scattering.

► Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorPrůša Stanislav,  doc. Ing., Ph.D.


R&D of high voltage and high power electric devices

The thesis will deal with the research and the development of new high voltage (> 600V) semiconductor devices (diodes and transistors) for High Performance Power Conversion (HPPC) and Motor Control (MC) applications in the automotive industry, renewable energy sources and transmission systems. These devices will be developed in collaboration with On Semiconductor company. The doctoral work will be focused on the development of new methods for diagnostics and analysis of defects of developed devices using instrumentation in CEITEC.

 Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

Supervisor:  Stanislav Průša, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Time and space resolved dynamics of metamagnetic nanostructures across the phase transformation

For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

Supervisor:  Spousta Jiří, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Tuneable magnetic materials based on heterostructures featuring a first-order magnetic phase transition

For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

►  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorKalousek Radek, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Catalytic growth of selected III-V semiconductor nanowires

The study will be aimed at the growth of III-Sb and III-As nanowires utilizing various catalyst nanoparticles in  a MBE chamber of the complex UHV system in the CEITEC Nano research infrastructure. Characterization of morphology, composition, and structure, as well as measurement of their optical and electrical transport  properties  will serve as  tools for monitoring the quality of nanowires.

►  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorKolíbal Miroslav, Ing., Ph.D.

 
Plasmon enhanced photoluminiscence

In this study plasmonic resonant nano-and micro-structures (particles, antennas, tips) will be used for enhancement of photoluminescence of nanostructures such as nanodots, nanowires and 2D materials (e.g. metal dichalcogenides: MoS2, WS2,....). In this way single photon sources provided by defects of these structures might be recognized.  

  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorDub Petr, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Fabrication of nanowire based devices for use in nanophotonics or bio-intefaces

Due to their geometry, one-dimensional materials seem to be natural building blocks for many device systems, e.g. in electronics or photonics. They can be easily and reproducibly contacted and allow to design 3D devices. Additionally, they seem to be natural choice for nanoscale electrodes (e.g. for detecting cells signalling) or for nanoscale-patterned macroscale electrodes (e.g. in electrochemistry). Currently, mostly undergraduates in our group deal with lithography, which is necessary for device design. We seek for a PhD candidate capable of fabricating a device geometry on demand, and aiming at performing measurements (electrical, optical) relevant for the device application (photonics, bio interfacing, sensing etc.).

  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorKolíbal Miroslav, Ing., Ph.D.


In-situ monitoring of nanostructures growth

Revealing the growth mechanisms at nanoscale is particularly challenging from many reasons. The most prominent advances in physics of nanostructure growth were achieved utilizing real-time in-situ monitoring techniques (both microscopic and spectroscopic). In our group, we have a large expertise in real time electron microscopy and, in the following year, we will install a new vacuum chamber dedicated to Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy. The aim of this PhD dissertation is to work on revealing puzzling growth modes of different nanostructures of interest (semiconductor nanowires grown by MBE, metallic/oxide threedimensional nanostructures formed by Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition etc.) utilizing state-of-the-art equipment. Close collaboration with ThermoFisher Scientific R&D labs will be part of applicants work.

  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

Revealing the growth mechanisms at nanoscale is particularly challenging from many reasons. The most prominent advances in physics of nanostructure growth were achieved utilizing real-time in-situ monitoring techniques (both microscopic and spectroscopic). In our group, we have a large expertise in real time electron microscopy and, in the following year, we will install a new vacuum chamber dedicated to Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy. The aim of this PhD dissertation is to work on revealing puzzling growth modes of different nanostructures of interest (semiconductor nanowires grown by MBE, metallic/oxide threedimensional nanostructures formed by Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition etc.) utilizing state-of-the-art equipment. Close collaboration with ThermoFisher Scientific R&D labs will be part of applicants work.

►  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

Revealing the growth mechanisms at nanoscale is particularly challenging from many reasons. The most prominent advances in physics of nanostructure growth were achieved utilizing real-time in-situ monitoring techniques (both microscopic and spectroscopic). In our group, we have a large expertise in real time electron microscopy and, in the following year, we will install a new vacuum chamber dedicated to Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy. The aim of this PhD dissertation is to work on revealing puzzling growth modes of different nanostructures of interest (semiconductor nanowires grown by MBE, metallic/oxide threedimensional nanostructures formed by Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition etc.) utilizing state-of-the-art equipment. Close collaboration with ThermoFisher Scientific R&D labs will be part of applicants work.

Supervisor: Kolíbal Miroslav, doc. Ing. , PhD.

 
Utilization of surface analytical methods for the study of nanostructures

For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorDub Petr, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Utilization of surface science approaches in nanotechnology II

For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

 Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

Supervisor:  Varga Peter, prof. Dr., dr. h. c.


RG 1-13 Molecular Nanostructures at Surfaces (Jan Čechal)


Long range ordered arrays of molecular quantum bits at surfaces   

Single molecular magnets (SMM) are molecular entities bearing nonzero magnetic moment. In addition to the magnetic properties SMM provide one important attribute: they represent two-state system that can be in superposition state, i.e., SMM represent quantum bits (qubits). Recent developments pushed the coherence properties of individual magnets to the range required for competitive qubits. However, for any future application the molecular qubits should be processable as thin films. Moreover, the individual qubits should be mutually interacting. The goal of PhD study is to prepare long-range ordered arrays of molecular qubits on solid surfaces a possible basis for a molecular quantum registry. The experimental research within the PhD study aims at the understanding of deposition/self-assembly phenomena of organic compounds containing magnetic atoms on metallic and graphene surfaces. A special focus will be given to graphene surfaces that provide means to control their electronic properties (by intercalation or external gate voltage) and, hence, mutual interaction of individual spins. The spin coherence properties will be investigated by cooperating partners at CEITEC and University of Stuttgart.

(For detailed information, please, directly contact the Jan Čechal)

►  Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorČechal Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Steering the molecular self-assembly by substrates 

Molecular self-assembly at surfaces present promising route for preparation of nanostructures with atomic precision with future prospects for molecular electronics, heterogeneous catalysis, and molecular templates among other topics. Here, the required structure is obtained from properly designed molecular/atomic components at the surfaces; the resulting structure is given by the dedicate interplay of all involved interactions. Until now the focus was given primarily to the effect of intermolecular bonding at particular surface. The goal of PhD study is to describe the effect of substrate on molecular self-assembly and explore the possibilities of external control of the self-assembly process. The experimental research within the Ph.D. study aims at the understanding of self-assembly phenomena at metal and graphene surfaces, i.e. reveal the effect of substrate lattice periodicity, strength and type of molecule-surface interaction, and substrate-molecule charge transfer. A special attention will be given to graphene, which will be used as substrate with tunable electronic properties. This will enable to disentangle the role of surface periodicity and electronic properties, respectively. More interestingly, graphene substrate offers the possibility to alter the self-assembly process and the functional properties of prepared nanostructures by external means, i.e., applied gate voltage. For detailed information, please, directly contact the Jan Čechal.

SupervisorČechal Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Real-time monitoring of oxide surfaces by low energy electron microscopy 

Transition metal oxides present key component for many functional systems, e.g., their surfaces form both active component and support in heterogeneous catalytic systems. However, these surfaces possess very complex and indicate structure. Thanks to their huge application potential huge experimental effort is devoted to describe the surface structure and the catalysis-related properties. The goal of PhD is to develop methodology for real-time monitoring of oxide surfaces by LEEM and describe the surface phase transitions on surfaces of selected metal oxides. Within the Ph.D. study, the model oxide surfaces will be analyzed by the low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) together with complementary techniques (e.g., XPS, AR-PES, STM) with the aim to determine mesoscopic ordering, coexistence of surface phases and kinetic of their transitions under oxidizing/reducing conditions. For this a detailed methodology of the monitoring the surfaces by LEEM and LEED will be developed including the quantitative assessment of low energy electron diffraction results. For detailed information, please, directly contact the Jan Čechal.

 Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

SupervisorČechal Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Utilization of surface science approaches in nanotechnology II

For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

► Fabrication and Characterisation of Nanostructures 

Supervisor:  Varga Peter, prof. Dr., dr. h. c.


RG 1-05 Development of Methods for Analysis and Measuring (Petr Klapetek)


Scanning probe microscopy based tomography

Scanning Probe Microscopy techniques (SPM) and particularly Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) are most common techniques for surface topography measurements. They have however still some limitations, for example its limited scanning range and lack of techniques for sub-surface mapping. Even if the interaction between probe and sample is already including information from sample volume, typically only surface topography or surface related physical properties are evaluated and the sub-surface information is lost. In most of the scanning regimes the amount of recorded and stored data is even so small that the information about sample volume is lost. On the other hand, there is lack of reliable subsurface mapping techniques with high resolution suitable for the growing field of nanotechnology, and methods of SPM tomography have large potential – and we can already see some first attempts for sub-surface mapping in the scientific literature. Aim of the proposed work is to develop techniques for mapping volume sample composition using SPM, particularly based on AC Scanning Thermal Microscopy and conductive Atomic Force Microscopy. This includes development of special reference samples, methodology and software development for control of a special, large area, SPM. In cooperation with the research group also a numerical modeling of probe-sample interaction will be performed and methods for sub-surface reconstruction will be tested.

  Development of Methods for Analysis and Measuring

SupervisorKlapetek Petr, Mgr., Ph.D.




RG 1-06 Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings (Jozef Kaiser)



Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in clinical research

Imaging techniques provide solid analytical platform also in clinical research where development and degradation of organs and soft tissues is studied. Recently, utilization of other complementary techniques are getting bigger attention. Among them, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique offers beneficial alternative for its advantages, such as real-time qualitative and quantitative multi-elemental analysis of samples under investigation. Exploiting LIBS, mapping elemental distribution on the sample surface is provided. Those results extend imaging outcomes with additional information and deepens the understanding of physical and chemical processes involved in development/degradation of soft tissues under influence of various parameters (toxicity, lack of nutrients, malignant tumours). In this dissertation thesis will be addressed further development of LIBS device (improving spatial resolution) and methodology optimization (reproducible analysis of soft tissues).

►  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

Supervisor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.


Lowering the detection limits of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique via innovative approaches

Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique that utilizes high power-densities obtained by focusing the radiation from a pulsed laser to generate a luminous micro-plasma from an analyte in the focal region. The micro-plasma emission is subsequently analyzed by a spectrometer. The plasma composition is representative to the analyte's elemental composition. The topics of the dissertation work include the application of LIBS and its modifications for high-resolution elemental mapping of solid samples.

  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

SupervisorKaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.


Advanced laser ablation based analytical techniques for high resolutin mapping

For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

►  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

SupervisorKaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.


Analysis using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) method in vakuum

Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique enabling elemental analysis of material in any state of matter (solid, liquid and gaseous). The fundamentals of this technique are in the laser ablation of the material in the interaction region defined by focused laser pulse. Then, created laser-induced plasma is composed of elements ablated from the sample and emits characteristic radiation. Wide span of elements emits radiation in visible spectral range and thus it can be detected using conventional spectrometers and detectors. On the other hand, spectral lines of certain elements (for instance C, N, S, P, Cl, and Br) are in the VUV spectral range (< 200 nm). The detection of such elements requires special instrumentation, which deals with high absorption of VUV radiation in air and majority of optical materials. The goal of this dissertation thesis is the detection of elements with prominent spectral lines in VUV range, for instance C, N, S, P, Cl, and Br. The essential part of this thesis lies in necessary design and construction of detection system (spectrometer with detector) enabling LIBS analysis with spectral resolution under 200 nm and with resolution lower than 0.2 nm. The detection system will be a modular expansion of LIBS interaction chamber, which is developed in the laboratory of laser spectroscopy at Institute of Physical Engineering FME BUT. After that, the newly constructed system will be tested for the LIBS analysis of above mentioned elements.

►  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

Supervisor:  Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.


Quantitative 3D characterization of biological structures by X-ray computed microtomography

X-ray computed microtomography allows to extract quantitative three-dimensional (3D) information about various objects and it is already a well-established and widely used technique for non-destructive testing, materials characterization and dimensional metrology. Moreover, modern developmental biology requires both qualitative and quantitative 3D information about the studied objects, which is not provided by conventional 2D imaging methods. The complexity of biological structures often necessitates a more comprehensive methodology to compare shapes and sizes. The Ph.D. study will focus on the application of procedures and analysis routinely used or developed for industrial computed tomography to address scientific questions in developmental biology. This approach brings new possibilities in imaging, data processing and evaluation of 3D biological models.

  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

Supervisor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.


Structure and properties of resistant heater coating systems produced by means of thermal spray technologies

The doctoral thesis is focused on research and development of complex multilayer coating heating systems composed from insulating and electrical resistance materials and produced by means of thermal spray technologies. The changes in physical and materials properties of heating systems will be also studied in detail. The aim of this work is to design of multilayer heating coating system with focus on its manufacturing utilizing powder metallurgy and thermal spray technologies processes, including the study of physical properties of each layer, its structural stability and phase transformations, which can take place within long term isothermal or cyclic thermal exposure. Conventional methods used in the field of material and physical engineering, which are available, will be used to study and evaluate in the frame of this work produced heating systems.

►  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

SupervisorČelko Ladislav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Advanced design, development and evaluation of the next generation of thermal barrier coatings

Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are playing a significant role in advancing the efficiency of aircraft gas-turbine engines. These high-temperature ceramic coatings provide a high level of thermal protection for the underlying turbine substrate as well as extensive durability under severe environmental conditions. While the effect of TBCs towards the engines efficiency has been recognized in industry over the past decades, advanced research focused on extending the life and performance of TBCs is still necessary and mandatory. The doctoral thesis will be focused on the detailed research and advanced development of multilayer TBCs systems. In particular, the PhD candidate will be focused on investigating and evaluating systems which will be composed of rare-earth zirconates (LZ) with the general formula Ln2Zr2O7 (where Ln = rare-earth ions). The aim of this study will be, thus, the design, development, testing and evaluation of multilayer thermal barrier coating architectures with increased temperature capability (above 1300 oC) and increased protection against severe environments (e.g. CMAS attack) for aircraft gas-turbine engines to overcome todays’ limitations and reach todays’ energy and technology needs. Novel synthetic and characterization techniques currently used in the fields of chemical engineering and materials synthesis will be applied to study, develop and evaluate these advanced ceramic systems.

  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

SupervisorMenelaou Melita, Dr., Ph.D.


Direct ink writing for fabrication of biological-tissue-like-constructs

This PhD research topic explores Direct Ink Writing method, also known as robocoasting, for in vitro fabrication of tissue-like-constructs with potential application as i) tissue or organ substitutes in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches or ii) development of models for in vitro testing of drugs and new therapies. Direct ink writing is an additive manufacturing method able to produce polymeric, ceramic or metallic shapes, besides, it offer the possibility to use cell-loaded materials to fabricate directly cell-containing constructs. Along the studies, the candidate will have the opportunity to learn and work from the synthesis of the materials for manufacturing, to the biological characterization of the manufactured constructs. Principal attention will devote to fabrication of bone-like tissues, but according with the results, other tissues such as pancreas, muscle or neuronal will be addressed. Highly motivated and collaborative candidates with outstanding track of records and with the ambition to learn from both materials and biological sciences are welcome to submit an application.

Direct ink writing for fabrication of biological-tissue-like-constructs

This PhD research topic explores Direct Ink Writing method, also known as robocoasting, for in vitro fabrication of tissue-like-constructs with potential application as i) tissue or organ substitutes in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches or ii) development of models for in vitro testing of drugs and new therapies. Direct ink writing is an additive manufacturing method able to produce polymeric, ceramic or metallic shapes, besides, it offer the possibility to use cell-loaded materials to fabricate directly cell-containing constructs. Along the studies, the candidate will have the opportunity to learn and work from the synthesis of the materials for manufacturing, to the biological characterization of the manufactured constructs. Principal attention will devote to fabrication of bone-like tissues, but according with the results, other tissues such as pancreas, muscle or neuronal will be addressed. Highly motivated and collaborative candidates with outstanding track of records and with the ambition to learn from both materials and biological sciences are welcome to submit an application.

  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

Supervisor:  Montufar Jimenez Edgar Benjamin, Ing., Dr.


Stability of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings – The role of the bond coat roughness

The work aims at deeper understanding of stability of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) as affected by the roughness of MCrAlY bond coat. Damage mechanisms and damage evolution in TBCs will be examined to identify the optimal topography of the bond coat in order to improve coating performance for components used in propulsion and power generation industries. Conventional MCrAlY + ZrO2-Y2O3 TBCs with the bond coat prepared by high-velocity oxyfuel spray and plasma spraying using feedstock powders with different size-distribution will be studied under high-temperature isothermal oxidation, thermal cycling, and room temperature mechanical loading.

►  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

Supervisor:  Slámečka Karel, Ing., Ph.D.


Charge carriers transport and noise in carbon nanofibers base supercapacitors

The goal is to propose the methodology for the supercapacitor lifetime prediction with respect to the attainment of 10 years life time guarantee required for the applications in the satellite systems. The methodology should be based on: 1) Analysis of the charge transport and the dependence of capacitance on the bias voltage or frequency, respectively, for capacitors of capacitance 1 to 100 F. 2) Analysis of time dependences for the charging of capacitors with constant current or constant voltage, respectively. 3) Supercapacitor’s self-discharge analysis. 4) Measurement of capacitance of Helmholtz layer and diffuse layer.

  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

SupervisorSedláková Vlasta, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Charge transport and its fluctuation at electrode/electrolyte interface

Due to stochastic nature of the matter, physical processes in materials are considered to be stochastic, and they reveal as fluctuation of measurable quantities macroscopically. Not only in sensorsics, these fluctuations are usually called noise, since they are assumed to be unwanted and distracting components, which do not carry any information. The aim is study of chargé transport and fluctuation mechanisms at electrode/electrolyte interface. Practical results lay in development of physical and electrical models on the basis of experimental study of amperometric gas sensors.

  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

SupervisorSedlák Petr, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Rigorous simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation in inhomogeneous media

The topic is focused on development of numerical methods for rigorous simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation in arbitrary inhomogeneous media. Namely, we assume investigation of the techniques based on the expansion into plane waves and/or eigenmodes in combination with perturbation techniques. Developed techniques will applied to modeling of light scattering by selected biological samples. Requirements: - knowledge in fields of electrodynamics and optics corresponding to undergraduate courses - basic ability to write computer code, preferably in Matlab.

  Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings

SupervisorPetráček Jiří, prof. RNDr., Dr.



1-12 Magneto-Optical and THz Spectroscopy (Petr Neugebauer)


Single-Molecule Magnets with Trigonal Symmetry of the Coordination Polyhedron: Structure, Magnetic Properties and Deposition on Surfaces  

Transition and inner-transition metal complexes possessing significant magnetic anisotropy often exhibit slow-relaxation of magnetization of a purely molecular origin and thus they behave as so called single-molecule magnets. The aim of this thesis is to investigate synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of coordination compounds of selected metal atoms (e.g. CoII, FeIII, DyIII) with tripodal ligands. Furthermore, the properties of hybrid systems prepared by deposition of selected compounds on surfaces (such as graphene, Au, transition metal dichalcogenides) will be performed. For more details please contact Petr Neugebauer.

Single-Molecule Magnets with Trigonal Symmetry of the Coordination Polyhedron: Structure, Magnetic Properties and Deposition on Surfaces  

Transition and inner-transition metal complexes possessing significant magnetic anisotropy often exhibit slow-relaxation of magnetization of a purely molecular origin and thus they behave as so called single-molecule magnets. The aim of this thesis is to investigate synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of coordination compounds of selected metal atoms (e.g. CoII, FeIII, DyIII) with tripodal ligands. Furthermore, the properties of hybrid systems prepared by deposition of selected compounds on surfaces (such as graphene, Au, transition metal dichalcogenides) will be performed. For more details please contact Petr Neugebauer.

Magneto-Optical and THz Spectroscopy

SupervisorNeugebauer Petr, Ing., Ph.D.


Development of Fourier Transform InfraRed Spectroscopy in High Magnetic Fields  

Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy in high magnetic fields presents an ideal combination of experimental techniques that can probe and elucidate properties of the most advanced materials. This technique provides complementary information to the commonly used measurements of transport, magnetization, and thermodynamic properties. The aim of this PhD project is to develop a compact spectrometer for FTIR spectroscopy in the high magnetic field at CEITEC BUT. The developed spectrometer will be used to perform sensitive measurements on Single Molecule Magnets (SMMs), modern 2D materials or combination of both.

Magneto-Optical and THz Spectroscopy

SupervisorNeugebauer Petr, Ing., Ph.D.


THz Frequency Rapid Scan Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy 

Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is a phenomenon, that can enhance greatly the NMR sensitivity (several hundred times at least). There are several mechanisms of DNP, though all of them result from the transferring of electron spin polarization (from special polarizing agents) to nucleus. This process is strongly dependent on the electron spin relaxation of the polarizing agent. However, due to the instrument limitations, the spin dynamics of polarizing agents is studied very poorly at frequencies above 100 GHz, especially at frequencies of 263, 329 and 394 GHz, which correspond to NMR proton frequencies of 400, 500 and 600 MHz, respectively. Usually, the spin relaxation properties are studied using the pulsed method. Unfortunately, the nowadays level of microwave sources at THz frequencies, mostly in terms of output power, does not allow the implementation of the pulsed technique in the wide frequency range. For this reason, the Rapid Scan Electron Spin Resonance (RS-EPR) spectroscopy is the only possible technique for the investigation of spin dynamics at THz frequencies. In this project, PhD student will (i) develop and implement a technique of fast frequency sweeps into the high field/high frequency EPR spectrometer (ii) investigate the spin relaxation processes in different DNP polarizing agents in the wide frequency and temperature ranges.

Magneto-Optical and THz Spectroscopy

SupervisorNeugebauer Petr, Ing., Ph.D.


Design of Multipurpose Sample Holder for THz Spectroscopy 

The aim of this PhD project is to develop multipurpose non-resonant sample holder for broadband Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectrometer based on THz rapid frequency scans (THz-FRaScan-EPR) as well as for Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) studies. Thanks to the developed sample holder the THz-FRaScan-EPR spectrometer will allow multi-frequency relaxation studies of variety of samples ranging from oriented bulk (crystal) materials, over powdered samples to air sensitive samples and liquid solutions. Furthermore, the design should allow inserting samples from Ultra High Vacuum. The sample holder should primary operate at frequencies between 80 GHz to 1100 GHz, at temperatures from 1.8 K to 300 K and at magnetic field up to 16 T. The sample holder will be tested on variety of samples ranging from Single Molecule Magnets over modern 2D solid state materials to air sensitive biological samples.

Magneto-Optical and THz Spectroscopy

SupervisorNeugebauer Petr, Ing., Ph.D.


Development of computational procedures and computer programs for processing pulsed EPR data

Pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) methods are intensively used to investigated structure and dynamics of complex macromolecules containing unpaired electrons. Among these methods Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR) also known as Double Electron-Electron Resonance (DEER) has emerged as a powerful technique to determine relative orientation and distance between macromolecular structural units on nanometre scale. For successful applications of pulsed EPR methods it is important to have tools enabling transformation of measured signals into structural information. The goal of this PhD project is to develop new effective computational procedures and computer programs for the processing of measured pulsed EPR data in order to extract structural and dynamical information from experiments. This goal also includes application of the developed computational methods to real experimental data obtained on the molecules tagged with spin labels. For more details please contact Petr Neugebauer.

 Magneto-Optical and THz Spectroscopy

SupervisorNeugebauer Petr, Ing., Ph.D.


New generation of graphene bolometers

Since the discovery a few years ago that a single layer of graphite, graphene, could be mechanically exfoliated from larger crystals using scotch tape, there has been an upsurge of research on graphene and other materials with a layered crystallographic structure similar to graphene. The possibility to combine single-layer materials with different electronic properties into heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces and the suitability for flexible substrates offer unprecedented opportunities for novel device architectures. The ideas can be realized thank to the progress in developing processes to grow large area, high quality, single-layer material since mechanical exfoliation is a slow process for research (although it provides high-quality layers) and it is indeed not suitable for commercial applications. Methods for large-area growth of graphene have been developed in the past few years and are now used by several groups. They include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on copper or nickel foils and epitaxial synthesis via Si sublimation at the surface of SiC substrates. However, substantial area growth of monolayers of other layered materials is still a challenge, although methods to grow millimeter-size monolayer films of MoS2 by CVD have already been developed. Fabrication of high-quality large-area monolayers facilitates the systematic study of another particularly intriguing aspect of these materials, namely that the dimension of a monolayer can be further reduced from 2D to 1D or 0D by patterning it in the shape of nanoribbons or quantum dots. The realization of quantum confinement down to zero dimension indeed leads to exciting physics, and we will investigate if it can be used for practical applications. In this thesis, we will study how quantum confinement, achieved by nanopatterning these two-dimensional (2D) materials can yield novel high-performance devices.  For more details, please contact Petr Neugebauer.

 Magneto-Optical and THz Spectroscopy

SupervisorNeugebauer Petr, Ing., Ph.D.


RG 1-15 Functional Layers and Nanostructures (Hermann Detz)


Fabrication and Structural Characterization of Novel Plasmonic Materials 

Plasmonic waveguides were demonstrated to be an ideal component of monolithic infrared sensing platforms. While at present, they are commonly used for the confinement and guidance of optical modes, they offer a lot of potential to make a transition from purely passive to functional components of optical systems. The candidate should investigate the fabrication of Heusler-compounds for plasmonics applications at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths by UHV sputtering processes. Experimental work will include the nucleation and growth in different semiconductor surfaces as well as the structural characterization of these materials by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Previous experience with relevant equipment within the CEITEC Nano Facilities (UHV sputtering, XRD, TEM) is of advantage. Applicants should be fluent in English and committed to self-motivated work in an international research group. Further relevant skills include utility programming for data analysis and lab automation (e.g. C++, Ruby, Python, Linux) as well as documentation and publication of results (LaTeX, etc.). The group of Dr. Hermann Detz focuses on hybrid plasmonic systems for applications in near- and mid-infrared sensing platforms. Particular emphasis is placed on the integration of novel plasmonic materials with established III-V optoelectronic devices. The group provides a multi-disciplinary, international environment. Scientific results are published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences.

Functional Layers and Nanostructures

SupervisorDetz Hermann, Dr.


Electronic and Optical Characterization of Novel Plasmonic Materials 

Plasmon propagation in metals and metallic compounds provides an ideal foundation for strong interaction between an optical mode and an electronic system. The functionality of plasmonic layers can be extended far beyond simple waveguide applications, e.g. by structuring into meta-surfaces. This thesis will be focused on the development of functional plasmonic surfaces and their interaction with semiconductor heterostructures. The candidate is expected to characterize the electrical and optical properties of novel plasmonic materials to pave the road for device integration with monolithic mid-infrared sensors. Previous experience with measurement setups at CEITEC (i.e. probe station, cryostats, ellipsometry) is of advantage. Applicants should be fluent in English and committed to self-motivated work in an international research group. Further relevant skills include utility programming for data analysis and lab automation (e.g. C++, Ruby, Python, Linux) as well as documentation and publication of results (LaTeX, etc.). The group of Dr. Hermann Detz focuses on hybrid plasmonic systems for applications in near- and mid-infrared sensing platforms. Particular emphasis is placed on the integration of novel plasmonic materials with established III-V optoelectronic devices. The group provides a multi-disciplinary, international environment. Scientific results are published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences. the electrical and optical properties of novel plasmonic materials to pave the road for device integration with monolithic mid-infrared sensors. Previous experience with measurement setups at CEITEC (i.e. probe station, cryostats, ellipsometry) is of advantage. Applicants should be fluent in English and committed to self-motivated work in an international research group. Further relevant skills include utility programming for data analysis and lab automation (e.g. C++, Ruby, Python, Linux) as well as documentation and publication of results (LaTeX, etc.). The group of Dr. Hermann Detz focuses on hybrid plasmonic systems for applications in near- and mid-infrared sensing platforms. Particular emphasis is placed on the integration of novel plasmonic materials with established III-V optoelectronic devices. The group provides a multi-disciplinary, international environment. Scientific results are published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences.

Functional Layers and Nanostructures

SupervisorDetz Hermann, Dr.


Integration of Plasmonic Nanoparticles with Semiconductor-Heterostructures  

Plasmonic nanoparticles allow efficient coupling between optical fields and quantum-mechanical systems within semiconductor-heterostructures. The optical response of the nanoparticles depends on their shape and size and can therefore be engineered through lithographic processes. The main goal of this thesis will be to optimize the sputtering and structuring to realize well-defined geometries. The electronic and optical properties of hybrid systems (plasmonic particles + two-dimensional electron gas) shall be characterized to allow their application as beam-shaping elements for infrared sensing platforms. Previous experience with measurement setups at CEITEC (i.e. UHV sputtering, electron-beam lithography, laser lithography, ellipsometry) is of advantage. Applicants should be fluent in English and committed to self-motivated work in an international research group. Further relevant skills include utility programming for data analysis and lab automation (e.g. C++, Ruby, Python, Linux) as well as documentation and publication of results (LaTeX, etc.). The group of Dr. Hermann Detz focuses on hybrid plasmonic systems for applications in near- and mid-infrared sensing platforms. Particular emphasis is placed on the integration of novel plasmonic materials with established III-V optoelectronic devices. The group provides a multi-disciplinary, international environment. Scientific results are published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences.

Functional Layers and Nanostructures

SupervisorDetz Hermann, Dr.



RG 1-17 Quantum Optical Technology (Andreas W. Schell)


Spectroscopy of novel quantum emitters 

During the last years, quantum optics has received growing attention (including Nobel Prices) for its ability to tailor quantum states in a highly controlled manner. Today, quantum optical systems start to emerge from the lab and start to be ready for real world applications. In this PhD project, novel solid-state quantum emitters are researched. The main tasks this involves are fabrication, optical characterization, e.g., with single photon spectroscopy, and the understanding of the properties of these emitters. For more detailed information please contact the supervisor.

Quantum Optical Technology

Supervisor: Schell Andreas Wolfgang, Dr.


Photonic structures for quantum optics  

During the last years, quantum optics has received growing attention (including Nobel Prices) for its ability to tailor quantum states in a highly controlled manner. Today, quantum optical systems start to emerge from the lab and start to be ready for real world applications. For these application it is necessary to be able to build quantum photonic elements. In this PhD project, photonic structures for such elements are designed, fabricated, and tested. For this, the underlying physics has to be understood, but also a hands-on approach in clean-room fabrication is required. For more detailed information please contact the supervisor.

Quantum Optical Technology

Supervisor: Schell Andreas Wolfgang, Dr.


Nanoassembly of quantum photonic elements  

During the last years, quantum optics has received growing attention (including Nobel Prices) for its ability to tailor quantum states in a highly controlled manner. Today, quantum optical systems start to emerge from the lab and start to be ready for real world applications. For these application it is necessary to be able to build quantum photonic elements. In this PhD project, this is done using the so-called hybrid approach, where those materials and nanoparticles are combined that can fulfil a specific task best. For this, the approach of nanoassembly is used, where either an electron microscope with manipulator an atomic force microscope is used to arrange specific configurations of nanoparticles and photonic structures. For more detailed information please contact the supervisor.

Quantum Optical Technology

Supervisor: Schell Andreas Wolfgang, Dr.


Optical investigation of nanosystems in a radio-frequency trap   

Using radio frequency traps, it is possible to study not only single ions decoupled from the environment – a technique that revolutionized physics – but also (larger) nanoparticles. Studying nanoparticles and their controlled interactions with light, electric fields, or other particles is of high interest in quantum optics and material science. In this PhD project, the student will develop the trap setup and the corresponding optical systems and thereafter use the setup to investigate the properties of nanoparticles decoupled from the environment. For more detailed information please contact the supervisor.

Optical investigation of nanosystems in a radio-frequency trap   

Using radio frequency traps, it is possible to study not only single ions decoupled from the environment – a technique that revolutionized physics – but also (larger) nanoparticles. Studying nanoparticles and their controlled interactions with light, electric fields, or other particles is of high interest in quantum optics and material science. In this PhD project, the student will develop the trap setup and the corresponding optical systems and thereafter use the setup to investigate the properties of nanoparticles decoupled from the environment. For more detailed information please contact the supervisor.

Quantum Optical Technology

Supervisor: Schell Andreas Wolfgang, Dr.



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