Advanced Materials

RG 2-01 Advanced Ceramic Materials (Martin Trunec)



Electrospinning of ceramic and composite fibers 

The main objective of the study will be fabrication and characterization of electrospun ceramic based fibers for electric and electrochemical applications.

 Advanced Ceramic Materials 

SupervisorČástková Klára, doc. Ing., Ph.D. 


Porous calcium phosphate materials for bioapplications

The aim of the work will be the preparation of porous ceramic structures based on calcium phosphates tailored to replace the intervertebral disc. Using advanced ceramic processes, the microstructure, chemical composition and mechanical properties of the material will be optimized to allow the colonization of the ceramic by specific cells that will support the process of integration and healing.

► Advanced Ceramic Materials

SupervisorČástková Klára, doc. Ing., Ph.D. 


Colloidal processing of ceramic nanoparticles

The subject of the PhD study is focused on shaping and consolidation of nanoceramic oxide particles. The main task of the student will contain a study of bulk colloidal ceramics processing using ceramic particles with size below 100 nm via colloidal shaping methods. The research will concern primarily with methods of direct consolidation of ceramic particles. A common difficulty of all these methods lies in the preparation of a stable concentrated suspension of nanoparticles with appropriate viscosity. The solution of the problem assumes understanding and utilization of colloidal chemistry and rheology of ceramic suspensions.

 Advanced Ceramic Materials

SupervisorTrunec Martin, prof. Ing., Dr. 


Machinable ceramics for 3D milling

The topic of this PhD study is a development of processing methods for a unique manufacturing of ceramic prototypes and small series of complex ceramic parts using 3D milling. The dissertation is focused on research into semiproducts (blanks) of advanced ceramics for 3D milling based on zirconia, alumina, calcium phosphates and other materials for dental and structural applications and prospectively even for customized complex-shaped surgical implants. The blanks will be prepared for both dense ceramic parts and bodies from a ceramic foam. For preparation of large and complex parts shaped machinable blanks will be developed that can ensure reliable and economical production of such parts.  The blanks will be processed by CAD/CAM methods utilizing CNC milling.

 Advanced Ceramic Materials

SupervisorTrunec Martin, prof. Ing., Dr. 


3D printing of ceramic structures by LCM Method

The PhD work will be concerned with manufacturing of complex ceramic parts with internal structure using the LCM method (Lithography-based Ceramic Manufacturing). The research will be focused on investigation of ceramic suspensions for the LCM method and on correlation between the processing conditions of LCM method and the properties of the final ceramic parts. The research will be aimed at applications in medicine. The internal structure of calcium phosphate bioscaffolds for bone regeneration will be optimized with respect to modification of ceramic skeleton with inorganic as well as organic biopolymers.

► Advanced Ceramic Materials

SupervisorTrunec Martin, prof. Ing., Dr. 


Thin flexible ceramic sheets for electrotechnical applications

The topic of the dissertation thesis focuses on research into flexible self-supporting ceramic foils with a thickness ranging from 0.05 to 1 mm. The research will be concern with the preparation of ceramic foils and with mechanical, electrical, or optical properties of such foils. The basic task will be the development of unique methods for the preparation of ceramic foils from nanoparticulate suspensions. The research will be aimed at electrotechnical applications that utilize ceramic foils as flexible dielectric substrates or piezoceramic energy harvesters.

► Advanced Ceramic Materials

SupervisorTrunec Martin, prof. Ing., Dr. 


Development of piezoelectric lead-free ceramics for energy harvesting

Recently, energy harvesting based on piezoelectric ceramics has attracted wide attention as an electric energy source for low-power electronics. Due to environmental aspects the commonly available piezoceramic generators based on PZT (Pb-Zr-Ti-O) must be replaced by lead-free materials. BCZT (Ba-Ca-Zr-Ti-O) a BT (BiFeO3) are very promising lead-free piezoelectric ceramic materials for this application. The work will be, therefore, focused on the development and study of these unleaded materials and their controlled doping for the purpose of efficient electric energy harvesting. The student will develop processes for preparation of piezoceramic and composite piezoceramic tapes for application in energy harvesters. The efficiency of the new materials in the energy harvesting will be evaluated. Internship at the University of Oulu is planned during the study.

 Advanced Ceramic Materials

SupervisorTrunec Martin, prof. Ing., Dr. 


Development of ceramic and hybrid structures for piezocatalysis and photocatalysis

Materials that can accumulate and transform mechanical and sunlight energy to chemical energy can be advantageously utilized for removal of chemical and biological pollutants. The work will be focused on the development and study of materials for the effective removal of dangerous pollutants using piezocatalytic and photocatalytic approaches. The student will develop methods for the preparation of ceramic and hybrid structures in the form of particles, fibres, layers, and bulk bodies and she/he will perform their evaluation in terms of efficiency and usability in the intended applications.   

 Advanced Ceramic Materials

Supervisor: Trunec Martin, prof. Ing., Dr. 


High entropy ceramic materials for ballistic protection

The recent research direction in the field of ballistic protection is a reduction of weight simultaneously with increasing demand for its ballistic resistance. Therefore, oxide ceramic materials are gradually replaced by non-oxide ceramic materials in personal ballistic protection, and lightweight composites are designed for ballistic protection of vehicles. The aim of this Ph.D. topic is the research of chemical reactions in ceramic-metal composites, which can increase energy absorption during the impact of a projectile. High entropy ceramic composites will be prepared as materials with a high potential to absorb kinetic energy. The fundamental research of reaction kinetics will be carried out on materials with a high probability of applications. The Spark Plasma Sintering method will be used to prepare novel composites, the properties of which will be further mechanically tested to optimize the parameters of their processing. 

 Advanced Ceramic Materials

Supervisor: David Salamon, doc. Ph.D.


Dielectric energy storage materials with high energy density

Nowadays limitations of electro-mobility, intelligent electrical networks, and pulse power systems are fast energy storage and release. The dielectric capacitors allow fast charging and discharging compared to lithium-ion batteries, moreover, these materials have a higher cyclic life. The ceramic-ceramic or ceramic-polymer composites seem to be the ideal candidates. This Ph.D. study aims to increase the energy density characteristics through modulation of the nanostructure in 3D (the formation of a texture) what is necessary for the mobile applications of these dielectric capacitors of a new generation. The innovative processing techniques such as Spark Plasma Sintering and Freeze-casting will be applied to achieve tailored microstructures of the investigated materials.  

► Advanced Ceramic Materials

Supervisor: David Salamon, doc. Ph.D.


Cold sintering of ceramic materials at extreme conditions​

A growing number of bioceramic materials are applied in tissue engineering of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Ideally, 3D scaffolds should be highly porous, have well-interconnected pore networks, and have consistent and adequate pore size for cell migration and infiltration. Scaffold architecture design can significantly influence both mechanical properties and cell behavior.  However, chemical and phase composition are critical for bioactivity and chemical reactions in bioreactors.  Aim of this Ph.D. study is to prepare ceramic bioreactors with various shape, chemical and phase compositions. Mainly the bioactive calcium phosphate materials will be shaped to the desired structure and combined with other materials to prepare bioreactors suitable for regenerative medicine. The research will require a multidisciplinary approach and cooperation with CEITEC BUT partners.  

 Advanced Ceramic Materials

SupervisorDavid Salamon, doc. Ph.D.



Progressive sintering techniques

Progressive sintering techniques enables the fast sintering of advanced ceramic materials, or the development of the final products with unique properties. The typical progressive sintering techniques are: Rapid Sintering, Spark Plasma Sintering, Flash Sintering and the newest Cold Sintering. The task of the proposed topic is the experimental verification of these novel techniques, study the kinetics of the sintering process and finding out the impact of these sintering techniques on the final properties (mechanical, optical, electrical etc.).

 Advanced Ceramic Materials

SupervisorIng. Václav Pouchlý, Ph.D.



RG 2-03 Advanced Polymers and Composites (Josef Jančář)


Modeling of object motion on the soft surface by durotaxis

Durotaxis is the motion of an object on the surface of a material controlled by this surface's stiffness. The motion of microscopic drops of material over a solid surface is presented in the literature. The motion is controlled by a surface stiffness gradient [Theodorakis, P. E .; Egorov, S. A .; Milchev, A. Stiffness-guided motion of a droplet on a solid substrate, JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 146, 244705, 2017.]. It is currently the subject of research on motion rules on soft surfaces (brush, gels, viscoelastic material).The student will compare the already known motion on a solid surface with the motion on soft surfaces. There will be investigated the role of entropy in these specific cases or whether it is influenced by intermolecular interactions. Directing objects' movement on the surface opens up further possibilities for designing organized structures at the molecular level.  In cooperation with Dr. Panagiotis Theodorakis, the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, PL.

Influence of self-assembly of hydrogels on its deformation response

 Advanced Polymers and Composites

Supervisor: Žídek Jan, Mgr., Ph.D. 


Modeling of deformation response of combined auxetic-classic materials

Auxetic materials are materials with a negative Poisson's ratio. Their specific feature is that, unlike standard materials, they expand in the perpendicular direction during tensile deformation. This factor gives a wide range of applications for highly stressed components, which should be fixed. Auxetic material cannot be easily removed from the place where it is fixed. Their disadvantage is low rigidity. One way for auxetic material reinforcement was when combined with a conventional porous material with a positive Poisson's ratio. The student will deal with various possibilities of combining materials with negative and positive Poisson's ratio. The effect of reinforcement and stress distribution during deformation will be investigated. Materials will be theoretically described using solid-phase mechanics.

  Advanced Polymers and Composites

Supervisor: Žídek Jan, Mgr., Ph.D. 



Adaptable engineering metamaterials

Project will focus on lightweight engineering materials fabricated by hierarchical assembly of building blocks into prescribed local architectures yielding unprecedent combination of stiffness, strength , toughness, impact resistance at low density and novel acoustic properties. Fundamental components investigated will include block copolymers and their nano-composites with controlled nanoparticle spatial organization.

 Advanced Polymers and Composites

Supervisor:  Jančář Josef, prof. RNDr., CSc. 


Non-linear mechanical response of self-assembled polymer nanocomposites

A key obstacle in the development of complex multiscale theories lies in our current inability to directly control the structure formation at multiple hierarchically arranged length scales. Directed self-assembly of surface decorated precisely defined NPs represents means for obtaining precisely controlled spatial arrangements of NPs. No theoretical framework has been published describing the laws governing multi length scale assembly of NPs into hierarchical superstructures in polymer continua. We aim at developing experimental and theoretical foundations for novel multiscale hierarchical predictive model of relationships between structural variables, nature and kinetics of the structural hierarchy formation via self-assembly of NSBBs and the physico-chemical and mechanical properties and functions in polymer nanocomposites.

 Advanced Polymers and Composites

Supervisor:  Jančář Josef, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Use of recycled PE/PP blends in engineering composites

The main objective of the proposed project is to investigate effects of structural variables such as molecular weight, supermolecular structure and interfacial tension of selected compatibilizers on the fracture behavior and environmental stability of PE/PP blends from recycled PE and PP. Principal goal of the project is the quantification of the structure – property relationships with emphasis on the molecular and supermlecular structure of the recycled PE/PP blends, interactions between PE/PP and compatibilizers and both the fracture mechanisms under both static and dynamic loading conditions and environmental stability. The results of the proposed project will enable to optimise the material’s composition with respect to the selected applications and will allow to expand application range of these materials into structural applications with greater added value.

 Advanced Polymers and Composites

Supervisor:  Jančář Josef, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Active interphases in fiber reinforced composites

The goal of the project is a design of LCP and suitable photonic dopants causing local conformational changes in the LCP network resulting in local deformation and preparation of block copolymer/quantum dots nanocomposites, developing suitable deposition technique of these systems into photonic networks on a solid substrate and testing of the light stimulated mechanoadaptability of the model systems.

► Advanced Polymers and Composites

Supervisor:  Jančář Josef, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Low density auxetic materials

The goal of the project is developing process for preparing structural foams, in which the wall material is a composite with auxetic inclusions, and which have a prescribed porosity and Poisson´s ratio profile and minimized thermal expansion coefficient.

► Advanced Polymers and Composites

Supervisor:  Jančář Josef, prof. RNDr., CSc.


Control release of bioactive substances using 3D hollow fiber scaffold and their application in bone and cartilage regeneration

For more details contact the supervisor.

► Advanced Polymers and Composites

SupervisorAbdel-Mohsan Abdel-Lattif, Dr., Ph.D.


Fabrication and characterization of nanofibers based on bionanocomposite and their medical application

For more details please contact the supervisor.

 Advanced Polymers and Composites

SupervisorAbdel-Mohsan Abdel-Lattif, Dr., Ph.D.


Functional Aerogels for Medical Applications

Aerogels are materials with controllable micro- or nano-sized pores and a high porosity, large specific surface area, and low density. Biopolymers (chitin, chitosan, cellulose) based aerogels will be fabricated by different techniques like supercritical drying or freeze dryer process. The main aim of the dissertation will be preparation, modification, characterization of functional aerogels based on different biopolymers and their derivatives for skin and bone regenerations.

 Advanced Polymers and Composites

SupervisorAbdel-Mohsan Abdel-Lattif, Dr., Ph.D.


Chemical Modification of Aerogels for Environmental  Applications

Aerogels are materials with controllable micro- or nano-sized pores and a high porosity, large specific surface area, and low density. Biopolymers (chitin, chitosan, cellulose) based aerogels will be fabricated by different techniques like supercritical drying or freeze dryer process. The main aim of the dissertation will be preparation, modification, characterization of functional aerogels based on different biopolymers and their derivatives for wastewater treatments.

► Advanced Polymers and Composites

SupervisorAbdel-Mohsan Abdel-Lattif, Dr., Ph.D.


Study of self-assembly of hydrophobically modified hyaluronic acid towards advanced drug carrier design

Carriers of active compounds represent an advanced platform for the controlled delivery of mostly water-insoluble drugs to the desired site in the human body. Hyaluronic acid derivatives were identified as one of the most promising groups of biomaterials for advanced carrier systems. However, precise control of the supramolecular structure is required to ensure application performance. Therefore, it is necessary to fundamentally understand self-assembly process of hydrophobically modified hyaluronic acid. Derivatives with various architecture of chains exhibiting different final properties were prepared. Therefore, a relationship between architecture of chains, structure of self-assembled units and functional properties will be developed. Nanostructure of self-assembled systems will be studied by both microscopic (SEM, AFM) and scattering (DLS, SAXS) techniques. Furthermore, fluorescence spectroscopy and rheology will be used. The supramolecular structure will be related to the physico-chemical properties of the chains and the key parameters controlling the self-assembly process will be identified. The influence of supramolecular structure on functional properties, especially the binding of hydrophobic substances, will also be studied.

 Advanced Polymers and Composites

Supervisor: Ing. František Ondreáš, Ph.D.





RG 2-04 Advanced Metallic Materials and Metal-Based Composites (Jan Klusák)


Properties and behaviour of advanced materials in xvery-high-cycle fatigue régime

Special engineering and bio-mechanical applications require the use of advanced materials. Because of their cost and purpose it is essential to ensure adequate strength of components made from them over the lifetime. From the viewpoint of material fatigue the number of load cycles often exceeds 107. Materials for these special applications will be tested in very high cycle fatigue regime, i.e. from 106 to 1010 cycles. Numerical simulations by FEM will be used to design specimens, tests will be carried out on ultrasonic testing machine, failure mechanisms will be searched using a scanning electron microscope.

 Advanced Metallic Materials and Metal-Based Composites

SupervisorKlusák Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Fracture mechanics of concentrators in composite materials

Composite materials exhibit outstanding properties thanks to suitable junction of two different materials. However, sharp materials interface can lead to degradation of the properties. Conditions of crack initiation in places of sharp shape and materials changes will be determined and evaluated using the procedures of generalized fracture mechanics.

► Advanced Metallic Materials and Metal-Based Composites

SupervisorKlusák Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Crack initiation and propagation in the area of gigacycle fatigue

With the ultrasonic loading machine, billions of load cycles can be achieved in a relatively short time. Thus cracks occur even under loads below the conventional fatigue limit. The process of crack formation and propagation in this area will be investigated experimentally and theoretically, among others using ultrasonic loading machine, electron microscopy and interferometric measurements of deformation of the tested sample.

 Advanced Metallic Materials and Metal-Based Composites

SupervisorKlusák Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Origin of characteristic chemical inhomogeneity and its impact on microstructural stability of wrought austenitic stainless steels

Within a stainless steel family comprising five basic types the wrought Cr–Ni austenitic stainless steels (ASSs) (AISI 300 grade) still occupy a privileged position. Due to their exceptional corrosion resistance and prominent mechanical and technological properties have found utilization in diverse industrial, domestic, architectonic and biological applications at room and elevated but also at cryogenic temperatures. The fcc paramagnetic austenitic structure of most of these alloys is known to be, however, metastable, i.e. it can partially transform to ferromagnetic bcc ′-martensite during cooling and/or plastic straining. The formation deformation induced martensite (DIM) can have a beneficial effect on mechanical properties of these steels (TRIP effect) but with respect to the corrosion resistance of these steels the presence of ′-martensite may be detrimental and in the case of some applications (e.g. superconducting magnets) must be avoided. The role of DIM in hydrogen environment embrittlement of metastable Cr–Ni steels considered as a perspective material for “hydrogen economy” is still controversial irrespective of the continuing progress.

Generally, the stability of ASSs and susceptibility to the deformation induced martensite (DIM) formation depends primarily on the chemical composition and temperature. A very important factor which has a crucial effect on the nucleation mechanisms, morphology and kinetics of DIM formation represents the stacking fault energy (SFE) which alone depends also on the chemical composition and temperature the deformation/hardening behavior of metastable ASSs is also strongly temperature dependent and is dictated by the dominant deformation mechanisms for a given temperature.

In the absolute majority of studies dealing with the stability of wrought AISI 300 grade austenitic stainless steels so far these materials are considered to be chemically homogeneous after numerous step of hot- and cold-working. The importance of local chemistry in the form of chemical banding on the destabilization in various semi-product forms of wrought AISI 304 grade steels has been recognized only recently (J. Man et al.: Effect of metallurgical variables on the austenite stability in fatigued AISI 304 type steels. Eng. Fract. Mech. 185 (2017) 139–159). A non-negligible role of chemical heterogeneity on hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) of various semi-product forms (bars vs. plates) of ASSs has been pointed out only recently.

The principal goals of the proposed comprehensive study are the following:

1) Experimental study of the origin of characteristic variations in local chemistry in the form of chemical banding in Cr–Ni ASSs during the whole industrial production way of their production – starting from continuously casted slabs and followed hot rolled semi-products up to the final cold-worked sheets. The main attention will be put on the characterization solidification behavior across the slab thickness and its inheritance to the final wrought steel forms (hot rolled thick plate, cold-rolled thin sheet) manufactured by a prominent European stainless steel producer Outokumpu.

2) Systematic monitoring of chemical homogeneity of AISI 300 series austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304, 316, 321 and some others) in various industrially produced wrought forms (cylindrical bars, thick and thin plates) and manufactured by different producers.

3) Thorough experimental study of the destabilization of austenitic structure and DIM formation in ASSs cyclically and monotonically strained under different external (strain rate, temperature) and internal (heat treatment) conditions in the perspective of their physical metallurgy and their correlation to local chemistry.

4) The clarification of the role of DIM formation on HEE and fracture behavior of ASSs using tensile tests under internal and external hydrogen conditions with emphasis on the semi-product form and local chemistry.

The chemical heterogeneity across the whole cross-section of various semi-product forms will be characterized by color metallography and quantitatively by EDS technique. The volume fraction of DIM will be evaluated by X-ray diffraction and Ferritescope. Modern high resolution microscopic techniques (SEM–FEG, ECCI, EBSD and TEM) as well as color metallography will be adopted to reveal the formation, distribution and morphology of DIM at different scales


 Advanced Metallic Materials and Metal-Based Composites

SupervisorIng. Jiří Man, Ph.D. 


Cyclic plasticity and low cycle fatigue behavior of austenitic stainless steel 316L manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM)

Additive manufacturing (AM), familiarly called also 3D printing, of metallic materials represents undoubtedly a revolution in production technology and presently very intensively studied research topic. Among the metallic AM techniques the most common and frequently utilized technology is selective laser melting (SLM) consisting in melting the metal powder using a laser beam. The SLM technology enables direct manufacturing of 3D complex shape parts and internal architecture from numerous powder metallic materials (especially Ti- and Al-alloys, stainless steels and nickel-based superalloys). This technology is generally characterized by high temperature gradients and solidification rates that have a significant impact on the non-equilibrium microstructures and properties of final parts which may considerably deviate from their wrought counterparts. At present, austenitic stainless 316L steel represents one of the most intensively studied SLMed material. Since this steel is considered for utilization in demanding and highly regulated sectors as nuclear and biomedical industry it is of object of numerous studies including mechanical behavior during monotonic and cyclic loading, corrosion behavior, radiation damage etc.             The structure of SLM 316L steel is due to the “welding” nature of SLM process completely different from its wrought counterpart with typical polyhedral grains and annealing twins. High temperature gradients and solidification rates during SLM process result also in fully austenitic 316L steel structure but with columnar grains with characteristic fine dislocation solidification cellular structure and nano-oxide particles. This specific complex hierarchical structure SLM 316L results in an outstanding combination of considerably higher yield strength than their conventionally produced counterparts without a reduced ductility. While a relatively great number of studies has been published to high cycle fatigue behavior of SLM 316L steel in condition of load-controlled fatigue tests, no systematic and thorough study has been devoted to cyclic plasticity and low cycle fatigue behavior of this steel.               To fill the knowledge gaps on low-cycle fatigue behavior of SLM 316L austenitic stainless steel the following several principal goals of the proposed study have been outlined.          1) Thorough systematic study of cyclic plasticity, cyclic stress-strain response and fatigue life of SLMed 316L steel cyclically strained under total strain control in wide range of applied constant total strain amplitudes. A great attention will be paid to the detail characterization of deformation mechanisms and possible changes within a unique but non-equilibrium cellular structure during intensive cyclic straining using advanced high-resolution microscopic techniques (SEM–FEG, ECCI, EBSD, TEM/STEM). Another very important topic will represent systematic studies on fatigue damage mechanisms, namely fatigue crack initiation using AFM and in situ monitoring of short crack growth.          2) Impact of various SLM processing parameters on LCF behavior of SLM 316L steel: (i) protective atmosphere during SLM process (nitrogen/argon) and (ii) the type of used powder (virgin/reused powder). Note that the material reuse in SLM process is of paramount importance to make LSM more cost-efficient and environmentally friendly.             3) Impact of various post-processing and post-heat treatments on LCF behavior and fatigue life. Three different states will be considered in LCF testing of cylindrical near net shape testing specimens – as built, mechanically and electrolytically polished and in addition to non heat-treated state two mostly adopted vacuum post-heat treatments will be adopted – stress relief and solution annealing.         Since fatigue behavior of SLMed materials is generally impaired by two features inherent to AM technologies, namely internal defects (especially detrimental is lack-of-fusion) and poor surface integrity accompanied by a possible subsurface porosity a great attention will be naturally paid to full characterization of porosity and surface roughness for all considered post-processing treatments.

► Advanced Metallic Materials and Metal-Based Composites

SupervisorIng. Jiří Man, Ph.D. 


Hydrogen storage in metallic materials with varied phase and chemical composition

Hydrogen is a very prospective and eco-friendly fuel which can bring significant economical and environmental benefits. The main obstacle that impedes expected future of hydrogen technology is safe and acceptably efficient hydrogen storage (HS). It is generally accepted that a possible solution to this problem is HS in solid phase of metallic materials (HSM). However, there are not HSMs up to now with sufficient HS properties at low temperature and pressure. Therefore, the main idea of this study is to investigate HS properties of new perspective model alloys which could show effective HS at temperatures near to room temperature and at low pressure.  One of ways how to influence HS properties HSM is to change their phase and chemical composition. The results could lead to new strategies in development of HSM. 

Advanced Metallic Materials and Metal-Based Composites

Supervisor: Lubomír Král, PhD. 


Hydrogen storage in Mg-based materials with various level of crystallinity

Hydrogen is a very prospective and eco-friendly fuel which can bring significant economical and environmental benefits. The main obstacle that impedes expected future of hydrogen technology is safe and efficient hydrogen storage (HS). It is generally accepted that a possible solution to this problem is HS in solid phase of metallic materials (HSM). However, there are not HSMs with sufficient HS properties at low temperature and pressure. Therefore, decreasing the thermodynamic stability of hydride phase of HSM with high hydrogen capacity is crucial for tuning their HS properties. One of ways how to influence thermodynamic properties is changing of structure states and chemical composition of HSM. The main idea of this study is to investigate the HS properties of model Mg-alloys in various states of structure from critically cooled or amorphous state to ordered crystallized structure. These materials could show desired HS properties at lower temperatures and pressures. The results could indicate new ways for development of new HSM. 

► Advanced Metallic Materials and Metal-Based Composites

Hydrogen is a very prospective and eco-friendly fuel which can bring significant economical and environmental benefits. The main obstacle that impedes expected future of hydrogen technology is safe and efficient hydrogen storage (HS). It is generally accepted that a possible solution to this problem is HS in solid phase of metallic materials (HSM). However, there are not HSMs with sufficient HS properties at low temperature and pressure. Therefore, decreasing the thermodynamic stability of hydride phase of HSM with high hydrogen capacity is crucial for tuning their HS properties. One of ways how to influence thermodynamic properties is changing of structure states and chemical composition of HSM. The main idea of this study is to investigate the HS properties of model Mg-alloys in various states of structure from critically cooled or amorphous state to ordered crystallized structure. These materials could show desired HS properties at lower temperatures and pressures. The results could indicate new ways for development of new HSM. 

Supervisor: Lubomír Král, PhD.


Mechanism of the small creep strains of the metallic materials at low stresses and transition to the plastic strain - model development and experimental study

Creep strains measured at very low applied stresses are, by their properties, very different from those measured at higher stresses during the conventional creep tests [1]. The stress and strain dependencies of the creep rate are much weaker and the strain is mostly anelastic.  Deformation mechanisms controlling these strains are not known, mainly because there are no observable signatures of the small strains in the microstructure. The small strain kinetics is clearly related to the internal stresses build-up. At present, only one simplified micromechanical model exists which is based on the dislocation segments bowing. This model combines the viscous glide and climb of dislocations [2], but its predictions are only relevant for very small strains, not explaining the transition to the normal plastic creep regime.    The main topic of the thesis is the development of the complex dislocation model which will provide better insight into a nature of creep strains which accumulate at very low stresses. The model should also address the transition into the normal plastic creep regime. The solution will be based on the simplified model mentioned above and will include realistic description of the interactions between dislocations and solute atoms.  Recently developed discrete dislocation dynamics method [3] will facilitate a statistical description of dislocation segments reaching a critical stress condition.   Experimental study of the low-stress creep of the selected metallic materials will be important part of the work. The materials having exceptional creep behaviour observed during the conventional creep tests will be targeted. 

► Advanced Metallic Materials and Metal-Based Composites

Supervisor: RNDr. Luboš Kloc, CSc.



RG 2-06 Advanced Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials (Jan Macák)



Synthesis and applications of novel 1D fiberous structures

Fiberous materials represent scientifically and technologically higly interesting materials, owing to their easy preparation, compositional flexibility, dimensionality, possibility to tune fiber dimensions vs. porosity, etc. The aim of this thesis is to develop new  compositions and structures of fibers with diameter on the sub-micron or micron scale. The focus will be given on inorganic fibers (in particular oxides) that have potential for filtration and catalytic applications.  In particular, part of the thesis will be also devoted to the development of electrically conducting fibers for various applications in textile, electronic and military industries. Two techniques will be mainly used: centrifugal spinning and electrospinning. Various shapes of fiberous structures will be investigated, including planar layers, bulky forms, fibers with a specific orientation, etc. The conducted research will be very application oriented. Cooperation with partners from industry is expected for the testing of the application potential of developed fibers.

 Advanced Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials

SupervisorMacák Jan, Dr. Ing.


Microwave and plasma synthesis of carbon dots for bioapplications

The aim of this Ph.D. topic is to investigate green and facile synthesis of CDs using microwave-assisted hydrothermal method or plasma synthesis from small organic molecules. Carbon dots (CDs) are a fascinating class of fluorescent nanomaterials, usually defined as carbon nanoparticles with a diameter below 10 nm. This family of materials includes graphene quantum dots (GQDs), carbon quantum dots (CQDs), carbon nanodots (CNDs), and carbonized polymer dots (CPDs). CDs display fluorescence depending on the excitation wavelength, excellent chemical stability and photostability, high water solubility, good biocompatibility, and low toxicity. Furthermore, they can be easily functionalized with other molecules (proteins, drugs, fluorescent dyes, etc.). By controlling the structure and size, their properties can be tailored to satisfy the demands of diverse applications in biomedicine, optoelectronics, solar cells, fluorescence sensors, photocatalysis, electrochemistry, and lithium-ion batteries. The thesis will study how the structure and dopping of CDs influence their functional properties, namely fluorescence and biocompatibility.

 Advanced Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials

Supervisor: doc. Lenka Zajíčková, Ph.D.


Plasma processing of polymer nanofibers for health-care applications

The proposed Ph.D. project aims to study the plasma processing of nanofibrous mats. The envisaged applications of the mats include health care textile, filtration, protective clothing, and catalysis. The most notable benefit of nanofibrous polymer mats is their porosity and high surface-area-to-volume ratio enabling moisture absorption, promoting the exchange of gases, and providing a high drug loading amount per unit mass. Morphological proximity to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is advantageous for wound dressing and tissue engineering when serving for cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation. Plasma polymerization solves the problem of hydrophobicity or chemical inertness of nanofibers. This project investigates plasma polymerization concerning plasma and surface processes leading to the retention of reactive functional groups, nanoparticle formation, and understanding the penetration depth into microporous materials. Magnetron sputter-deposition of Cu-based coatings onto polymer nanofibers will be studied to prepare antibacterial coatings. The proposed Ph.D. topic is part of two international research projects integrating the collaboration with the Russian Academy of Sciences and Luxemburg Institute of Science and Technology.

 Advanced Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials

Supervisor: doc. Lenka Zajíčková, Ph.D.



RG 2-07 Advanced Biomaterials (Lucy Vojtová) 


3D smart hydrogel platforms for cell imaging

The main aim of this work is to prepare “smart” hydrogel substrates that are able to react to pH or temperature and are suitable for 2D and 3D cell monitoring in molecular biology or tissue engineering, or for testing new drugs on cancer cells. Hydrogels should be suitable for both in vitro and in vivo applications. In addition to chemical-physical characterization, hydrogels will be subjected to biodegradation and monitoring of biocompatibility in vitro.

► Advanced Biomaterials

SupervisorLucy Vojtová, PhD.



Nanocellulose-based biomaterials

The main aim of this work is preparation and modification of nanocellulose natural material with finding suitable conditions for preparation of „smart“ biomaterials for wound healing. The modification will be carried out by enzymes ensuring biodegradation of nanocellulose and thus setting the “lifetime” of the biomaterial with respect to the rate of wound healing. In addition to chemical-physical characterization, the hydrogels will also undergo enzymatic degradation and biological monitoring of biocompatibility in vitro.

 Advanced Biomaterials

SupervisorLucy Vojtová, PhD.


Protein stabilization for transdermal applications

The main objective of the study will be to find a suitable method for stabilization of proteins used for transdermal applications, its optimization and characterization including efficacy evaluation of prepared materials.

 Advanced Biomaterials

SupervisorLucy Vojtová, PhD.



RG 2-08 Bioelectronics Materials and Devices (Eric Daniel Glowacki) 


Wireless light-powered neurostimulation devices

Neuromodulation technologies rely on electrical stimulation of the nervous system, and are used both in fundamental research and in numerous medical applications. Wireless stimulation devices, powered by tissue-penetrating deep red and infrared light wavelengths, can enable minimally-invasive solutions without wires and interconnects. This project involves fabrication and testing of light-powered neurostimulation, with a focus on maximizing efficiency while reducing the size of devices. An important parameter is the formation of a low-impedance electrical contact with the neural tissue. The project involves micro and nanofabrication, with a focus on semiconductor materials and electronics, while also involving advanced electrochemical and photoelectrochemical measurements. Collaboration with neuroscientists and participation in animal studies is envisioned as an important aspect of the project.

► Bioelectronics Materials and Devices

Supervisor: Eric Daniel Glowacki, Ph.D.


Materials for field effect transistors in silicon technology and bioelectronics

The work is aimed at novel materials which are potential candidates to be useful for fabrication of planar and eventually 2-dimensional field effect transistors (2D FET). Research still has big gaps in the field of new 2D materials beyond graphene. Additionally, the area of bioelectronics is also interesting mainly for using of novel materials for neuro-recording and/or neuro-stimulation. Hence, there are opportunities to find appropriate utilization of materials for fabrication of devices in silicon‑based technology and also on flexible substrates. These materials can be used as physical and chemical sensors and chronic bioelectronics devices.

► Bioelectronics Materials and Devices

Supervisor: Ing. Imrich Gablech, Ph.D.


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